You might think that living through a hurricane will change people’s minds about global warming. Not so much.

Tuesday 12 September 2017

In theory, people who have experienced hurricanes should be more concerned about global warming. In practice, it's more complicated.

Two residents paddle though their flooded neighborhood in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma in Fort Myers, Fla., on Sept. 12. (David Goldman/AP)
Two residents paddle though their flooded neighborhood in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma in Fort Myers, Fla., on Sept. 12. (David Goldman/AP)

This article co-authored by Associate Professor Llewelyn Hughes was published by The Washington Post on 12th September 2017.

For the past two weeks, Americans have been gripped by the devastating impact of Hurricane Harvey. This only intensified over the weekend with the landfall of Hurricane Irma. The recovery from these catastrophic storms will take months, if not years. As the focus shifts from recovery to planning for the future, people will undoubtedly focus on climate change. While the science suggests that severe weather will become more frequent thanks to global warming, it is difficult to say that global warming caused any specific storm. Scientists, however, are more certain that effects of climate change are making storms like Hurricane Harvey worse.

This raises an awkward political question — do extreme weather events like hurricanes change people’s minds about whether global warming is taking place?   Read the full article here. 

 

 

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